First Call

Today, April 3, 1973, the year my Little Girl was born, this happened! 

First public mobile phone call is made
Motorola engineer Martin Cooper stands on a sidewalk in midtown Manhattan and uses a prototype handheld mobile phone to call his team’s main competitor in the field, Bell Labs’ Joel Engel. The first handheld cell phone is nicknamed ‘the brick.’    Source – Bing 

1967:
He developed products including the first cellular-like portable handheld police radio system, produced for the Chicago police department in 1967.

1973:
Here he conceived of the first portable cellular phone in 1973 and led the 10-year process of bringing it to market.

1973:
Cooper is the lead inventor named on “radio telephone system” filed on October 17, 1973, with the U.S. Patent Office and later issued as U.S. Patent 3,906,166.

1986:
In 1986 Cooper co-founded Cellular Payphone Inc. (CPPI), the parent company of Great Call, Inc., Innovator of the Jitterbug cell phone (in partnership with Samsung).

1991:
Martin Cooper married Arlene Harris in 1991.

1992:
In 1992 Cooper co-founded Array comm a developer of software for mobile antenna technologies.    Martin Cooper Timeline source

From Thought Co.  Dr. Martin Cooper, a former general manager for the systems division at Motorola, is considered the inventor of the first modern portable handset. In fact, Cooper made the first call on a portable cell phone in April 1973 to his rival, Joel Engel, who served as Bell Labs head of research. The phone was a prototype called the DynaTAC and weighed 28 ounces. Bell Laboratories had introduced the idea of cellular communications in 1947 with the police car technology, but it was Motorola that first incorporated the technology into portable device designed for use outside of automobiles.

By 1977, AT&T and Bell Labs had constructed a prototype cellular system. A year later, public trials of the new system were held in Chicago with over 2,000 customers. In 1979, in a separate venture, the first commercial cellular telephone system began operation in Tokyo. In 1981, Motorola and American Radio telephone started a second U.S. cellular radio-telephone system test in the Washington/Baltimore area. And by 1982, the slow-moving FCC finally authorized commercial cellular service for the USA.  Source You may conclude this article HERE.

Wasn’t that fun?!

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Unbearable!

This was just too cute; I just had to borrow it from Bing.

Unbearable cuteness
A photographer happened to catch these brown bear cubs in the act of stealing a boat. Patiently, he watched from afar, snapping photo after photo. Realizing what the cubs were doing, he knew he should document this event. Intent on getting the boat into the water, the cubs worked like they’d done this before. Lighting out onto the lake, the bears seemed to enjoy the ride.

For years, scientists have known that brown bears are unusually intelligent. Observations of tool use in bears are common. Only this was something different—two cubs handling a small fishing boat like old pros. Later, the boat ran aground, and the ursine passengers exited, disappearing back into the forest.

Don’t believe this story? Neither do we. Go back and look at the first letter of every sentence in the first two paragraphs. 

Saturday Morning Pancakes!

Pancakes! I wanted pancakes this morning.  Settled for a sausage biscuit instead. Albeit that biscuit was baked with einkorn flour, non-hydrogenated shortening and the sausage was nitrites free. Good and tasty eating; but I still want the pancakes.  So here’s this:

How to Make Perfect Pancakes

Here’s the recipe given at the site above. 

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 cup melted butter
1 egg
1 1/2 cup milk
This gave me a batch of seven really fluffy pancakes. Alternatively, you can use your favorite boxed pancake mix if you’d prefer.

Tip numbered 6 was new to me!
                                         Add toppings before you flip.

Now I can have as many blueberries or pecans per pancake as I want!!

There are 6 other tips at the site HERE.

You’re welcome.   🙂