Cheese Dip, Anyone?

Real Cheese Queso Dip Appetizer Recipe
By Kate

Ingredients
1/2 lb Pepper jack Cheese – cubed
1/2 lb American Cheese (White) – cubed
1 cup whole milk (maybe more for thinning the dip out later)
8 oz cream cheese
1/2 cup regular sour cream
1 can Rotel
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp chili powder

Instructions: Combine all ingredients in the slow cooker and cook on low for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, stirring every so often.
Or, in a medium size saucepan, combine all ingredients and stir often while this is heating up. Then, transfer to a 2 quart crock pot once heated. Keep on warm to keep the dip “dipable” and enjoy!

It’s suppose to be really good! If you try it let me know. 

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I Can Do That!

I thought you might be interested in this article by Emily Cappiello. Purportedly, she wrote it for Reader’s Digest and MSN picked it up for their site as well. Read it below.

Doing This Activity 1 Hour a Week Lowers Heart Attack Risk by 70 Percent

You no doubt know that aerobic exercise like walking, cycling, and swimming can help your heart. But now it looks like strength training may be just as important for your ticker, according to research from Iowa State University. The best part? You only need to do it for about an hour a week.

In the study, published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, researchers analyzed the health, hearts, and exercise habits of more than 13,000 adults. They were focusing on three health issues: Heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular events that weren’t fatal; total cardiovascular events including deadly ones; also, death from all causes.
The researchers discovered that people who regularly strength trained had a much lower risk of all three conditions. In fact, lifting weights for less than an hour per week could reduce the risk of a heart attack or a stroke by a staggering 40 percent to 70 percent. “People may think they need to spend a lot of time lifting weights, but just two (daily) sets of bench presses that take less than five minutes could be effective,” Duck-chul Lee, PhD, associate professor of kinesiology, said in a press release.

Lee says the findings suggest you don’t have to hit the recommended aerobic-exercise guidelines—30 minutes a day, most days of the week—to lower your heart disease risk. “The results are encouraging,” he says, “but will people make weightlifting part of their lifestyle? Will they do it and stick with it? That’s the million-dollar question.” Lee did note that while cardio exercise is easier to incorporate into one’s lifestyle, it is essential to attempt to find some time to also participate in resistance training. This can include daily lifestyle activities like gardening or lifting heavy shopping bags.

Good news; don’t you think?